Service for Adult

Service for Adult

This section explains some of the services available to adults from MHCC. Please contact the office at: (954)-280-2056 to start the application process.

Before services can be started, you will take part in an assessment to find out if you are eligible for services and what services will best meet your needs. During this planning process, you will be helped to figure out the medically necessary services as well as amount, scope, and duration of those services. You will also be able to choose who provides your supports and services. You will receive an individual plan of service that provides all of this information.

includes a comprehensive psychiatric evaluation, psychological testing, substance abusescreening, or other assessments, except for physical health, conducted by aqualified mental health practitioner to determine person’s level of functioning and mental health treatment needs.

provides intensive and basic services and supports essential for people with serious mental illness to maintain independence in the community. An ACT team will provide mental health therapy and help with medications. The team may also help access community resources and supports needed to maintain wellness and participate in social, educational, and vocational activities.

is a weekly cognitive behavior therapy group service focused on reducing anger and enhancing self-control and is offered in many of our counties.

is a review that occurs if a person’s illness or disability involves behaviors that they or others who work with them want to change. Their individual plan of service may include a plan that talks about the behavior. This plan is often called a “positive behavior supports plan.” The positive behavior supports plan is developed during person-centered planning and then is approved and reviewed regularly by a team of specialists to make sure that it is effective and dignified and continues to meet the person’s needs.

services are available to patients at MHCC who are working to manage mental illness, and reintegrate into the community. PSR focuses on several areas including: medication use and compliance, independent living, social skills training, housing, vocational and employment rehabilitation, social support and network enhancement, structured activities, symptom management, treatment options, money management, maintenance of living environment and assimilation into the community. PSR services are commonly utilized for patients who are coming out of crisis events. However, services are available to all behavioral health patients. Patients are encouraged to gradually decrease the amount of weekly visits to PSR up until the time that they no longer need services.

are programs where members (adult consumers with a mental illness) and staff work side-by-side to operate the clubhouse and to encourage participation in the greater community. Clubhouse programs focus on fostering recovery, competency and social supports, as well as vocational skills and opportunities. Programs such as this are available in several of our communities.

is a therapeutic approach to helping resolve emotional and behavioral disturbance by looking at how the consumer’s thoughts and beliefs impact the way they feel and behave. According to this model, the best way to change dysfunctional emotions and behaviors is to modify inaccurate and dysfunctional thinking. There are a number of thought distortions and irrational beliefs that humans are drawn toward, but are not helpful. For instance, a person might use “all-or-nothing thinking” and view things as either all good or all bad—if their performance falls short of perfect, they see themselves as a total failure. Another example is “overgeneralization,” where you see a single negative event as a never-ending pattern and may view a situation in terms of “never” going right or “always” going wrong. The goal is to help the consumer recognize and change negative thoughts and maladaptive beliefs that lead to distressing emotions and/or ineffective ways of coping. In realizing these mistaken beliefs, a person’s mood and subsequent behaviors improve as a result. CBT is brief/time-limited and present-centered, focused on current concerns.

is a part of the person-centered planning process that assists individuals to use community services and to participate in community activities.

are activities provided by paid staff that help adultswith either serious mental illness or developmental disabilities live independently and participate actively in the community. Community Living Supports may also help families who have children with special needs (such as developmental disabilities or serious emotional disturbance).

are unscheduled individual or group services aimed at reducing or eliminating the impact of unexpected events on mental health and well-being.

are unscheduled individual or group services aimed at reducing or eliminating the impact of unexpected events on mental health and well-being.

Multi Health Community Center, Inc., (MHCC) is offering a variety of services to our communities via telephone and teletherapy options during this challenging time. MHCC serves Broward County, especially Oakland Park City. Community members will have access to teletherapy sessions to address mental health needs related to our current difficult times. Please contact your local MHCC office, or call to (954)-280-2056 to inquire about this service.

MHCC provides a comprehensive array of services for people with a co-occurring disorder. Eligibility for services requires that an individual has both a serious mental illness as well as a substance use disorder.

The best practice model for treatment of both disorders is a comprehensive, continuous, integrated system of care. Staff providing services have expertise and competencies in both disorders and are able to treat the whole person, over time, regardless of their treatment adherence or level of substance use.

The most intensive interventions are delivered by a team. The Integrated Dually Diagnosed Treatment teams (IDDT) may be connected to Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) team. Services offered by the IDDT teams include stage matched interventions designed to meet the recipient where they are in their recovery from their mental illness and their substance use.

For individuals that do not have a co-occurring disorder or where an individual's substance use is primary, you have several options for your treatment needs.


Access, Assessment and Referral (AAR)

determines the need for substance use disorder services and will assist you in getting to the right services and providers.

Intensive Outpatient (IOP)

is a service that provides more frequent and longer counseling sessions each week and may include day programs.

Methadone and LAAM Treatment

is provided to people who have heroin or other opiate dependence. The treatment consists of opiate substitution monitored by a doctor as well as nursing services and lab tests. This treatment is usually provided along with other substance abuse outpatient treatment.

If you receive Medicaid, you may be entitled to other medical services not listed above. Services necessary to maintain your physical health are provided or ordered by your primary care physician. If you receive Community Mental Health services, your local Community Mental Health services program will work with your primary care physician to coordinate your physical and mental health services.

If you do not have a primary care doctor, your local Community Mental Health services program will help you find one.

By providing clinical services through neurofeedback, we're able to improve our brain wave training. This covers a broad range of symptoms, including autism spectrum disorder, ADD, hyperactivity, anxiety, depression, insomnia and migraine headaches. It is helpful in boosting emotional and physical well-being. Neurofeedback offers personalized brain training sessions for our clients.


More than 15 million Americans have serious problems related to the use of alcohol. In any given person, these problems can include alcohol addiction (i.e., alcohol dependence or alcoholism) or non-addicted alcohol abuse. Symptoms of addiction and abuse often overlap. For this reason, doctors view them as part of a single condition called alcohol use disorder. Whether present on its own or in combination with non-addicted abuse, alcoholism can lead to serious negative health outcomes unless you or your loved one receive treatment.

What is Detox?

Detoxification (detox) is the process that happens when substance use comes to a halt and any remaining amount of drugs or alcohol gradually leaves the body. This process forms an essential first step for anyone seeking to recover from alcohol addiction. A period of detox is required because a physical dependence on alcohol produces lasting alterations in normal brain function. In order to correct these alterations and begin the path to sobriety, you must first break the active cycle of dependence. To achieve this important goal, you must stop consuming alcohol. When the brain of a dependent person no longer receives the accustomed amount of alcohol, that individual will begin to develop symptoms of withdrawal. The most common of these symptoms include:Detoxification (detox) is the process that happens when substance use comes to a halt and any remaining amount of drugs or alcohol gradually leaves the body. This process forms an essential first step for anyone seeking to recover from alcohol addiction. A period of detox is required because a physical dependence on alcohol produces lasting alterations in normal brain function. In order to correct these alterations and begin the path to sobriety, you must first break the active cycle of dependence. To achieve this important goal, you must stop consuming alcohol. When the brain of a dependent person no longer receives the accustomed amount of alcohol, that individual will begin to develop symptoms of withdrawal. The most common of these symptoms include:Detoxification (detox) is the process that happens when substance use comes to a halt and any remaining amount of drugs or alcohol gradually leaves the body. This process forms an essential first step for anyone seeking to recover from alcohol addiction. A period of detox is required because a physical dependence on alcohol produces lasting alterations in normal brain function. In order to correct these alterations and begin the path to sobriety, you must first break the active cycle of dependence. To achieve this important goal, you must stop consuming alcohol. When the brain of a dependent person no longer receives the accustomed amount of alcohol, that individual will begin to develop symptoms of withdrawal. The most common of these symptoms include:

  • An inability to think clearly
  • A depressed or anxious state of mind
  • An irritable state of mind
  • Nervousness or jitteriness
  • Rapid mood changes
  • Unpleasant dreams
  • Lack of energy

Other possible hallmarks of alcohol withdrawal include:

  • Headaches
  • Declining appetite
  • Pupil dilation
  • Nausea accompanied by vomiting
  • A racing heartbeat
  • Uncontrolled shaking
  • Sleeplessness
  • Unusually pale and clammy skin
  • Excessive sweating

Heavy drinkers going through withdrawal are also susceptible to seizures or convulsions. Doctors use both these terms to describe disorganized bursts of electricity that circulate throughout parts of the brain and disrupt normal function. In people addicted to alcohol, convulsions usually take the form of major, full-body events called generalized tonic-clonic (i.e., grand mal) seizures, which can trigger symptoms such as incontinence, breathing difficulties and unconsciousness. Furthermore, roughly one in every 20 people detoxing from alcohol will experience a potentially lethal complication known as delirium tremens or the DTs. Prominent symptoms of the DTs include such things as:

  • A delirious mental state marked by extreme confusion and/or hallucinations
  • Heartbeat irregularities
  • Intense agitation
  • Convulsions
  • Unexplained fear or dread
  • Rapid changes in mood
  • Prolonged periods of deep sleep

Most people who develop delirium tremens have a history of long-term, daily heavy drinking. They also tend to have poor dietary habits linked to the presence of alcohol addiction.

The Importance of Medically Supervised Detox

It’s common for people affected by alcohol dependence to attempt to go through detox on their own. However, this approach to quitting has serious drawbacks, and public health officials and addiction experts do not recommend it. First and foremost on the list of potential problems is the sheer unpredictability of what will happen to a person going through alcohol withdrawal. If seizures, delirium tremens or other unforeseen complications arise, they can quickly lead to dangerous changes in your health and mental well-being. A doctor who knows what to look for can identify problems at an early stage and help prevent them from getting worse. If you or your loved one detox on your own, however, you will not have access to this crucial medical oversight. Lack of medical supervision during alcohol detox also increases the odds of experiencing a relapse back into active drinking. This increased risk is largely the result of the unpleasant feelings generated by the withdrawal process. In order to escape these feelings, a significant number of people break off their attempt to achieve sobriety and return to alcohol use. At the same time, detox is often accompanied by intense alcohol cravings. These cravings add even more weight to relapse risks. There is a third risk of detoxing without medical oversight: alcohol poisoning (i.e. alcohol overdose). When active drinking comes to an end, tolerance to the effects of alcohol will naturally decline. If a relapse occurs and you return to drinking, you may find that a level of intake that once did not overwhelm your system may now trigger the onset of a potentially fatal overdose event. The odds of this happening rise as detoxification runs its natural course. Enrollment in a reputable medically supervised detox program provides a safer alternative for coping with the effects of alcohol withdrawal. When help is available from doctors, therapists and other medical professionals, the risks for complications, relapses and overdoses decline. While nothing can completely eliminate these risks, supervised detoxification provides the best possible scenario for positive results.

Summit’s Alcohol Program

Summit Detox’s alcohol detoxification program is based on the guiding principles established by the foremost experts in addiction medicine. These principles outline three basic steps in the detox process:

  • A detailed, personalized evaluation of each person who enters the program
  • Stabilization of each patient’s physical and emotional/psychological health in order to maximize the benefits of detoxification
  • Preparation of each patient for follow-up enrollment in an alcohol treatment program once detox comes to a successful conclusion

Sedation is well-recognized by addiction specialists as the most effective method of easing some of the worst symptoms of alcohol withdrawal. Summit provides this gold standard treatment with benzodiazepines and barbiturates, two classes of prescription sedative/tranquilizers only available to people under proper medical supervision. We also provide crucial support in the form of basic medical monitoring, IV fluids and nutritional supplementation. Additional core program resources include counseling and psychotherapy. Several factors can influence the exact course of detoxification. These include:

  • The severity of your alcohol addiction
  • The length of time for which addiction has been present
  • Your general level of physical well-being
  • Your general level of mental well-being

No matter which specific steps are taken, our ultimate goal is effective care that sets the stage for long-term alcohol addiction recovery.

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